Trigeminal Neuralgia (tic douloureux) - symptoms, causes and treatment

Trigeminal Neuralgia (tic douloureux) – symptoms, causes and treatment

There is sudden darting pain which is severe, accompanied by spasms of the muscles of the face and tingling and burning of the skin. A slight redness and swelling of the affected side will be seen, along with an increased flow of saliva and tears.
The affected nerves and skin become very tender; and movements of the face, speaking, and chewing may provoke violent pain.

Causes

Tic douloureux is a common form of neuralgia. It generally occurs in winter. There are three divisions of the sensory nerve of the face most likely to be affected. The first is in the eyeball and over the forehead; the second is in the side of the face, the cheekbone, and the upper teeth; the third is inside the mouth and in the lower teeth.

 
The cause of the problem is chilling of the face over a period of time, when the rest of the body is relatively warm. The formula for trouble is

(1) chilling draft to part of the body while the rest is warm

(2) over a period of several hours,

(3) day after day. See “Neuralgia” for more on this.

Trigeminal Neuralgia (tic douloureux) - symptoms, causes and treatment

Trigeminal Neuralgia (tic douloureux) – symptoms, causes and treatment

Treatment

• Keep the affected area warm. Apply hot, wet fomentations to it. Bed rest is helpful, depending on the severity of the problem.
• A cleansing fruit juice fast for several days would enable the body to work more effectively in solving the problem. But keep in mind that a nerve was damaged by chilling over a lengthy period of time, so healing may not always come immediately.
• Apply warm fomentations (or warm whole baths) several times a day.

 

• On an ongoing basis, make sure that parts of your body are not exposed to chilling drafts.
• The medical route is to operate on the face and destroy a nerve. This eliminates the pain, and also permanently numbs part of the face. Some operations result in paralyzing part of the face; you cannot know, in advance, what the operation will do to you.

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